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回り込み解除

回り込み解除

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回り込み解除

※ 英語が分からない自分用の予習メモです。


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>> September 20th, 2014 (Sat.)


What am I reading? I'm reading about the Boston Tea Party.
No, it's not quite like that. It's not tea and scones and polite conversation.
It was one of the major events that led up to the American Revolution.
Hmmm, where to start? So this was before America was independent.

It was still part of the British Empire.
The people who lived in the American colonies paid taxes to the British government,
but they were not represented in the British government, so they were angry.
"No taxation without representation" is what they thought.

In this situation, the British government passed the Tea Act,
which encouraged Americans to buy their tea from the East India Company,
a British company, by allowing the British to sell their tea at the cheapest prices.

This caused more outrage. People in America saw this as further interference from Britain.
So in December 1773, a group of protestors, disguised as Native Americans,
snuck onto three British ships carrying tea,
and they threw around 350 crates of tea into the water!

You can imagine how angry the British back in England were.
They reacted by closing down Boston for commerce
and also taking more direct control of Massachusetts,
which had until then been allowed to govern itself.

This fanned the flames of resentment in the British American colonies
and is one of the reasons the people in the colonies revolted.
And you know what? Have you heard of the Tea Party movement?
Yes, a group of conservatives.

They take their inspiration from the Boston Tea Party,
in that they are anti-tax and anti-government intervention.
So this event still carries currency.


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>> September 20th, 2014 (Sat.)


What
am I reading? I'm reading about the Boston Tea Party.
No, it's not quite like that. It's not tea and scones and polite conversation.
It was one of the major events that led up to the American Revolution.
Hmmm, where to start? So this was before America was independent.
何を読んでいるかって?ボストン茶会事件について読んでいるのよ。
いえ、そういうのでは全然なくて。お茶やスコーン、お上品な会話ではないわ。
アメリカ革命を前振りする大事件のひとつよ。
ふむむ、何処から始めれば?そうね、これはアメリカ独立前のことなの。

the Boston Tea Party (米国の)ボストン茶会事件
[1773年米植民地の人が英政府の(茶に対する)課税に反対し
ボストン港の英船を襲い船中の茶箱を海に投げ捨てた事件]

scone [N]スコーン<パンの一種>


It was still part of the British Empire.
The people who lived in the American colonies paid taxes to the British government,
but they were not represented in the British government, so they were angry.
"No taxation without representation" is what they thought.
アメリカはまだ大英帝国の一部だったの。
アメリカの植民地に住んでいる人々はイギリス政府に税金を払っていたのだけれど、
彼らはイギリス政府の代表にされなくて、怒っていたの。
代表なくして課税なし」と彼らは考えたの。

the British Empire [N]大英帝国
[イギリス本国と植民地・保護領・自治領すべてを含む。
帝国=武力を背景にその版図を広げていく国家を指す。
現在では the Commonwealth of Nations (英連邦)という呼び方になっている]

colony [N]植民地 the Colonies = 東部13植民地(アメリカ最初の植民地13州)
represent [V]<人・組織などを>代表する
[He is representing everything that is good and decent in this country
彼はこの国の良さすべてを体現している]

taxation [N]課税 / 徴税
representation [N]代表(権) / 代理(権)


In this situation, the British government passed the Tea Act,
which encouraged Americans to buy their tea from the East India Company,
a British company,
by allowing the British to sell their tea at the cheapest prices.
この状況で、イギリス政府は茶税法を通し、
アメリカに住む人にイギリス企業の東インド会社から彼らのお茶を買うように奨励したの。
イギリス人に最安値でお茶を売ることを許してね。

the Tea Act 茶税法 // Law[N](法律全体を指す)法 Act[N]法令 / 条例 / 決議
encourage [V]奨励する / 元気付ける / 励ます
the East India Company 東インド会社
<<東洋貿易を目的に作られた会社。インド全域を支配下に置くなど、強力な力を持っていた。
イギリスが自由貿易政策を取ったため、貿易独占権を取り上げられ、
セポイの乱(インドの民族独立運動)の責任を取るかたちで、1858年に解散に追い込まれる>>

allow [V](…を)許す
cheap [A]安い cheapest 最安の


This caused more outrage. People in America saw this as further interference from Britain.
So in December 1773, a group of protestors, disguised as Native Americans,
snuck onto three British ships carrying tea,
and they threw around 350 crates of tea into the water!
これは更に怒りを引き起こしたの。アメリカにいる人はイギリスが更に干渉してきたと見たの。
それで 1773年の12月に抗議者グループがアメリカ原住民に変装して、
3隻のお茶を運ぶイギリスの船に忍び込んで、
約350箱のお茶を水の中に投げ込んだのよ。

outrage [N]【不可算名詞】憤慨 / (正当な)怒りの気持ち
interference [N]干渉 / 口出し
protestor [N]抗議者 / 異議を申し立てる人
disguise (as...) [V](…の姿に)変装する [N]変装 / in disguise 変装した
sneak (onto/into ...) [V](…に)こそこそと入る / 忍び込む
[sneak ⇒ 過去形 sneaked // アメリカの話し言葉では snuck も用いられる]
crate [N](ガラス・陶器類・果物などを運ぶ)木箱 / 木枠


You can imagine how angry the British back in England were.
They reacted by closing down Boston for commerce
and also taking more direct control of Massachusetts,
which had until then been allowed to govern itself.
イングランドに戻るイギリス人の怒りがどのようなものか想像できるわね。
彼らは貿易するボストン港を閉鎖すること、
それまで自治が許されていたマサチューセッツ州の直接統治をさらに行うことで応じたの。

close down …を閉鎖する
commerce [N]貿易 / 商業 / 通商 / 交渉
direct control 直接統治
govern itself 自治を行う govern[V]治める / itselfそれ自身


This fanned the flames of resentment in the British American colonies
and is one of the reasons the people in the colonies revolted.
And you know what? Have you heard of the Tea Party movement?
Yes, a group of conservatives.
これはイギリスのアメリカ植民地にある深い恨みの炎を煽ったの。
植民地反乱の理由の一つね。
アレよね?ティーパーティー運動って聞いた事ある?
そう。保守派のグループね。

fan [V](感情などを)煽る / 扇動する / 助長する
flame [N]炎
resentment [N](長く続く/鬱積した)憤り / 立腹
revolt [V]反乱を起こす / 反抗する [N]反乱 / 暴動
conservative [N]保守派勢力 [A]保守的な


They take their inspiration from the Boston Tea Party,
in that they are anti-tax and anti-government intervention.
So this event still carries currency.
彼らはボストン茶会事件から着想を得ていて、
課税反対と政府介入反対の立場にあるのよ。
それで、この出来事はいまだに息づいているの。

inspiration [N]着想 / ひらめき
anti-tax 課税反対の anti- …に反対する
intervention [N]仲裁 / 介入
carry currency 通用する currency流通 ⇒ 流通性を持っている = 通用する


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スポンサーサイト

回り込み解除

※ 英語が分からない自分用の予習メモです。

【Tango : YouTube】 ← タンゴカッコヨカッタ…

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>> September 13th, 2014 (Sat.)

Before we get started, I want everyone to take a seat.
We're not going to start working on the basic tango steps just yet -
first I want to tell you about the dance and the music that are the tango.

I assume you've all seen it in movies -
the dance of love, the dance of controlled passion,
danced by a couple gliding perfectly in sync together in the candlelight.
You probably imagine the woman having a rose in her mouth.
Well, that's movie tango. There's more to tango than that.

Some of you may associate it with Argentina
as it comes from the area that borders Argentina and Uruguay.
What a lot of people don't know is that it's a mixture of many different cultures.

In tango music, you can find the rhythms of African communities, brought as slaves;
you can find traces of the Cuban habanera and the Argentine milonga and Uruguayan candombe,
as well as the music of European immigrants.
Back then, it was the music of the people, the music of the street.

Then, in the early 20th century,
musicians and dancers from Buenos Aires began to head over to Europe,
sparking the first tango craze. It was the Parisians who took to it first,
but soon it was popular in cities such as London and Berlin.

Its popularity there spurred the well-heeled back in Argentina to start dancing the tango,
moving it into the ballroom, and this is the form that comes down to us.
So now that we have some background, let's start with the basics.
On your feet, everyone! Divide into couples.
It takes two to tango, remember.


* * * * * * * *


>> September 13th, 2014 (Sat.)

Before we get started, I want everyone to take a seat.
We're not going to start working on the basic tango steps just yet -
first I want to tell you about the dance and the music that are the tango.
始める前に、皆さんに座って頂きたいです。
タンゴの基本ステップの練習はまだ始めません。
まずは、タンゴという踊りとその音楽についてお話したいです。

just yet (否定文で)今すぐは…しない


I assume you've all seen it in movies -
the dance of love, the dance of controlled passion,
danced by a couple gliding perfectly in sync together in the candlelight.
You probably imagine the woman having a rose in her mouth.
Well, that's movie tango. There's more to tango than that.
あなた方は皆、タンゴを映画で見たことがあると思います。
愛の踊り、抑制された情熱の踊り、
蝋燭の光の中、二人一組が滑るように完璧に揃った動きで踊る。
おそらく、女性が口に薔薇を咥えているのを想像するでしょう。
まあ、それは映画のタンゴです。タンゴはそれよりもっと奥が深いのです。

assume [V] (根拠なしに)…だと思う / 推測する presume[V](ある程度根拠があり)…だと思う
controlled passion コントロールされた情熱 passion[N]情熱 controlled[A]抑制された
glide [V]滑るように音もなく動く(飛ぶ) / 滑走(滑空)する glider[N]グライダー
[glissando[N] gliss. グリッサンド奏法 = 滑らせるように高音を上げ下げする演奏技法
sulr[V]【音楽】<音符を>続けて演奏する / <音符に>連結線を付ける / 早口に不明瞭に言う]

in sync sync = synchronization [N] in sync <<口語>>同調 / 一致して
candlelight [N]蝋燭の明かり / 灯ともし頃・黄昏・夕方
[イギリス人は、白熱電球で間接照明をするのが好きな人が多い]
there's more to ... than that …には、それ以上の深み(奥行)がある


Some of you may associate it with Argentina
as it comes from the area that borders Argentina and Uruguay.
What a lot of people don't know is that it's a mixture of many different cultures.
タンゴはアルゼンチンとウルグアイの境界が発祥の地ですから、
あなた方の幾人かはタンゴについてアルゼンチンを連想するかもしれません。
多くの方が知らないのは、タンゴは多くの異文化が混ざり、出来たものだということです。

associate [V]…を関連付ける / 連想する
[associate = connect (someone or something) with someting else in one's mind = 心の中で結び付ける]
[link = make (from, suggest) a connection wit = 心の中の縛りは無いので、物理的にも使える]

Argentina [N]アルゼンチン / Argentine [A]アルゼンチンの / [N]アルゼンチン人
border [V]…を区切る / 縁を付ける / …と境界をなす / 隣接する
Uruguay [N]ウルグアイ / Uruguayan [A]ウルグアイの / [N]ウルグアイ人
mixture [N][a mixture of](…の)交錯 / 混合物


In tango music, you can find the rhythms of African communities, brought as slaves;
you can find traces of the Cuban habanera and the Argentine milonga and Uruguayan candombe,
as well as the music of European immigrants.
Back then, it was the music of the people, the music of the street.
タンゴの音楽に、奴隷として連れてこられたアフリカの人々のリズムを見出すことができます。
キューバのハバネラやアルゼンチンのミロンガ、ウルグアイのカンドンベ、
ヨーロッパの移民の音楽も共に見出せるでしょう。
当時、タンゴの音楽は庶民の音楽、市井の音楽だったのです。

brought as ... (…を)もたらした / 引き起こした
slave [N]奴隷
trace [N]名残 / 痕跡 / a trace of ... (trace of) 微かな(微量の)… [V](…の跡を)たどる
habanera [N]ハバネラ 【YouTube】
※カルメンの曲はセバスチャン・イラディエルが作曲したものを借用したもの
[スペインでブームになった曲がフラメンコと混じりアルゼンチンに上陸し、タンゴのルーツになった]

milonga [N]ミロンガ 【YouTube】
[アルゼンチン/ウルグアイ/ブラジル南部の音楽ジャンルとその踊り、タンゴの踊られる場所を指す]
candombe [N]カンドンベ 【YouTube】
immigrant [N]移住者


Then, in the early 20th century,
musicians and dancers from Buenos Aires began to head over to Europe,
sparking the first tango craze. It was the Parisians who took to it first,
but soon it was popular in cities such as London and Berlin.
そして、20世紀初めに
ブエノスアイレス出身の音楽家や舞踏家がヨーロッパに渡り始めました。
最初のタンゴ流行の始まりです。初めにパリの人間がタンゴを気に入ったのですが、
すぐにロンドンやベルリンなどの都市に広まりました。

head over to ... …に向かう
spark [V]燃え立たせる / 引き起こす / 活気付ける [N]火花
craze [N]熱狂的流行 / 熱狂
take to ... …が好きになる / 気に入る / 熱中する


Its popularity there spurred the well-heeled back in Argentina to start dancing the tango,
moving it into the ballroom, and this is the form that comes down to us.
So now that we have some background, let's start with the basics.
On your feet, everyone! Divide into couples.
It takes two to tango, remember.
その流行の影響は、アルゼンチンへ戻り、裕福な人々がタンゴを踊り始め、
舞踏室にタンゴを進出させました。それは私たちに伝えられている形です。
さて、背景を知りましたので、基本から始めましょう。
立って下さい、皆さん!二人一組に分かれて下さい。
タンゴを踊るには二人必要、思い出して下さいね。

spur [V][目的語+前置詞+(代)名詞] <人を>[…へ]駆り立てる / …するように刺激する
well-heeled [A]<<口語>>金持ちの [N]the well-heeled 金持ち階級 / 裕福な人々
now that (…した)からには / …だから
come down […まで]下へ伸びる[届く]
on one's feet 立ち上がって / 立って
It takes two to tango. 「喧嘩両成敗」の意味 / タンゴを踊るには二人必要


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回り込み解除

※ 英語が分からない自分用の予習メモです。

【E-waste : Google image】

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>> September 6th, 2014 (Sat.)

Dad you can't just throw away your old phone like that.
Do you know what happens to old phones?
They become e-waste;
that's what Ms. Smithson was saying today.

Old phones, old computers, old TVs, they all become e-waste;
they get sent off to places like China and Africa,
where people pull them to bits and sell the parts.
And there's more and more and more e-waste in the world now
because technology gets old or machines stop working or people simply want a new phone

Ms. Smithson was saying
that some of the stuff you find in your phone is bad for your health.
If you simply dump it, the toxic materials can cause air pollution and water pollution.
The people who pull the e-waste to bits also get affected.
It's bad for their health. It can cause cancer and things like that.

It's really bad when they just throw the stuff away,
but when they burn it, it becomes even more dangerous for the people there.
It's stuff like ... I have a list ... no, stay there ... contaminants such as lead,
cadmium, beryllium, or brominated flame retardants.

Did you know that by throwing away your phone now
you're adding to the 50 million tons of e-waste each year?
Ms. Smithson says here in the States
we throw away about 30 million computers and 130 million phones each year.

It's supposed to grow by over a third in the next few years.
There will be enough e-waste to weigh the same as eight of the pyramids in Egypt.
What should you do? First, don't just throw it away.
Re-using or recycling your phone is the best thing to do.


* * * * * * * *


>> September 6th, 2014 (Sat.)

Dad, you can't just throw away your old phone like that.
Do you know what happens to old phones?
They become e-waste;
that's what Ms. Smithson was saying today.
お父さん、古い携帯電話をそんな風に捨てちゃだめだよ。
古い携帯電話はどうなるか知っている?
電子廃棄物になるんだよ。
スミッソン先生が今日そう言っていたの。

e-waste [N]electronic waste 電子廃棄物 =電子機器や家電製品などの廃棄物の総称
throw away [V+ADV]<物を>打ち捨てる / 廃棄する
[(硬めの言い方)discard廃棄する / (砕けたニュアンス)let go of...手放す]


Old phones, old computers, old TVs, they all become e-waste;
they get sent off to places like China and Africa,
where people pull them to bits and sell the parts.
And there's more and more and more e-waste in the world now
because technology gets old or machines stop working or people simply want a new phone.
古い携帯電話、古いコンピューター、古いテレビは全部、電子廃棄物になるのよ。
中国やアフリカなどの場所に送られて、
そこでバラバラにして、部品を売るの。
今、世界では電子廃棄物が増え続けているの。
技術が古くなったり、機械が動きを止めたり、単に人が新しい携帯電話を欲してね。

send off to ... [V+ADV]…に送られる / [for... を]取り寄せる(取りに行く人が依頼人から離れる)
[off を入れることで、自分の立ち位置から離れていくというニュアンスになる]
pull … to bits (引き離して)…をバラバラにする to bit粉々に
[(硬)disassemble分解する / disjoint解体する(本来組み合わせっている物を外す)]


Ms. Smithson was saying
that some of the stuff you find in your phone is bad for your health.
If you simply dump it, the toxic materials can cause air pollution and water pollution.
The people who pull the e-waste to bits also get affected.
It's bad for their health. It can cause cancer and things like that.
スミッソン先生は、
携帯電話の中にある物質は、健康に悪いと言っていたよ。
何もせず捨てたら、有害物質が大気汚染や水質汚染を引き起こすの。
電子廃棄物をバラバラにする人も、悪影響を受けているの。
健康に悪いんだよ。癌やそういうものを引き起こすの。

stuff [N](特定の物を指さない、漠然とした)物、物質
[substance物を構成する実質的内容の質 / thingythingumbob例のあれ
thingy = 名前を知らない / 名前を忘れた / 名前を言いたくない時に使う ]

dump [V](どさりと)捨てる dump truck / 厄介払いする (恋人を振る)
toxic material [A]有害な [N]物質 有害物質
pollution [N]公害 / 汚染
get affected (特に悪い)影響を受ける / move(感動させる)の意味もある
⇒類 influence <良い・悪いニュアンスなく>影響を与えて変化させる


It's really bad when they just throw the stuff away,
but when they burn it, it becomes even more dangerous for the people there.
It's stuff like ... I have a list ... no, stay there ... contaminants such as lead,
cadmium, beryllium, or brominated flame retardants.

そのまま捨てるだけでも本当に悪いのに、
燃やすと、ますますそこの人々の危険になるの。
どういう物かと言うと…わたし、一覧表を持っている…ダメ、待ってて…鉛、
カドミウム、ベリリウム、臭素化難燃剤などの汚染物質。

□ even more さらに
contaminant [N]汚染物質 contaminate[V]汚染する
lead [N]【科学】[Pb]
cadmium [N]カドミウム[Cd] イタイイタイ病の元 ホタテの中腸線に蓄積される
beryllium [N]ベリリウム[Be] ベリリウム肺症
brominated flame retardant [N]臭素化難燃剤
[可燃性の素材に添加することにより燃えにくくする薬剤 / 神経系、甲状腺など内分泌系に悪影響]


Did you know that by throwing away your phone now
you're adding to the 50 million tons of e-waste each year?
Ms. Smithson says here in the States
we throw away about 30 million computers and 130 million phones each year.
携帯電話を捨てることによって、
毎年 5千万トンの電子廃棄物が増えるのを知っている?
スミッソン先生はここアメリカでは、
毎年 およそ 3千万トンのコンピューター、1億3千万トンの携帯電話が捨てられると言っていたの。

add to ... …を増やす / …を継ぎ足す


It's supposed to grow by over a third in the next few years.
There will be enough e-waste to weigh the same as eight of the pyramids in Egypt.
What should you do? First, don't just throw it away.
Re-using or recycling your phone is the best thing to do.
数年後には、3分の1以上増えると予想されているの。
エジプトのピラミッド8個と同じくらいの重さに達する電子廃棄物になるのよ。
どうするといいか?まず、捨てるのはやめて。
携帯電話を再使用、再資源化することが一番良いことなんだよ。

suppose [V]だと思う be supposed to …[受け身]…すると思われる / 予想される
third [可算名詞]3分の1
weigh [V]重さがある
re-using [N]再使用 = 形を変えずに利用する
recycling [N]再資源化 = 形を変えて利用する


* * * * * * * *

回り込み解除

※ 英語が分からない自分用の予習メモです。


* * * * * * * *


>> August 30th, 2014 (Sat.)

So who here has heard of Jim Crow? Put your hands up.
Right, everyone. And does anyone know who Jim Crow was? No?
That was a trick question.

Jim Crow wasn't a person;
it was a bad word for an African American person.
It came from a very bad song and dance routine that was performed
by a white man pretending to be a black man and making fun of black men.

So why don't we just forget about the word?
Why am I telling you about it now?
Because it came to be linked to a terrible set of laws,
starting back in the 1890s in the southern part of the States,
that treated black people very badly.

The laws were designed to keep black and white people apart.
For example, black people weren't allowed to go to the same schools as white people,
they weren't allowed to eat in the same restaurants,
they weren't even allowed to drink at the same drinking fountains.

This was called segregation -
I'm sure many of you have heard that word already.
And these laws came to symbolize the terrible ways white people treated black people
throughout the States - whether by law or by custom -
as though they were an inferior species.

It was only in the 1950s that the laws began to be overturned by the Supreme Court.
The highest court in the United States said
that school segregation was against the Constitution.

That's only 60 years ago!
The other laws were overturned in the 1960s.
Even so, many would say our country still hasn't resolved many of the issues
from the time of segregation.


* * * * * * * *


>> August 30th, 2014 (Sat.)

So who here has heard of Jim Crow? Put your hands up.
Right, everyone. And does anyone know who Jim Crow was? No?
That was a trick question.
さて、ここにいる人は、ジム・クロウを聞いた事がありますか?手を挙げて下さい。
はい、全員ですね。誰か、ジム・クロウとは何者か知っていますか?知らない?
これはひっかけ問題でした。

Jim Crow [N]<<軽蔑>>黒人 / 黒人差別(Jim Crowism) [A]黒人差別待遇の
[元々黒人をcrow(カラス)と呼ぶことはあったが、
1928年にJump Jim Crow という Minstrel Show (白人が黒人に扮して歌うコメディ)が流行し、
黒人を指す言葉、黒人を蔑む言葉と認知されるようになった。
Jim Crow は、田舎のみすぼらしい黒人を戯画化したキャラクター]

trick question [N]ひっかけ問題


Jim Crow wasn't a person;
it was a bad word for an African American person.
It came from a very bad song and dance routine that was performed
by a white man pretending to be a black man and making fun of black men.
ジム・クロウは特定の人物ではありません。
アフリカ系アメリカ人に向けられた酷い言葉でした。
白人が黒人に扮して、黒人をからかう、
非常に失礼な歌と踊りの出し物から由来した言葉です。

bad word [N]= bad language下品な言葉 / 酷い言葉
[差別用語~性的で口にするのを憚られる言葉までを全体的に指す]
[黒人蔑称: Negro / Black / Darkey / Nigga
1960年代後半に米国でBlack is beautiful.の運動が起こり、Negroに代わりBlackが使われるようになり、
現在では新聞・雑誌などではBlackのほうが好まれる// African-American が現在使用される]

routine [N](演芸で)型に嵌った[お決まりの]所作[演技/出し物]
pretend [V][to be ...]…である真似をして遊ぶ/ふりをする
make fun of ... …をからかう


So why don't we just forget about the word?
Why am I telling you about it now?
Because it came to be linked to a terrible set of laws,
starting back in the 1890s in the southern part of the States,
that treated black people very badly.
ですので、言葉についてはちょっとこれまでにしておきましょうか?
ジム・クロウについて話しているのは何故なのか?

so why don't ... なので、…してはどうだろうか?
link [V]関連させる / 繋ぐ be linked to ...[受け身]…と関連付けられる
[The strength of a chain is its weakest link / 鎖の丈夫さは一番弱い輪で決まる]


The laws were designed to keep black and white people apart.
For example, black people weren't allowed to go to the same schools as white people,
they weren't allowed to eat in the same restaurants,
they weren't even allowed to drink at the same drinking fountains.
その法律は、黒人と白人を隔離するために作られました。
例えば、黒人は白人と同じ学校に行くことを許されませんでした。
同じレストランで食事をすることも許されませんでした。
同じ水飲み場で飲むことすら許されませんでした。

keep apart 離す keep A and B apart / keep A apart from B
allow [V](…を)許す [受け身]be allowed (to do)…することを許させる
□ same A as B Bと同じA
drinking fountain [N](噴水式)水飲み場(口/器)


This was called segregation -
I'm sure many of you have heard that word already.
And these laws came to symbolize the terrible ways white people treated black people
throughout the States - whether by law or by custom -
as though they were an inferior species.
これは、人種隔離政策と呼ばれています。
あなたたちの多くは、この言葉をすでに聞いたことがあると思います。
これらの法律は、アメリカにおいて白人が黒人を - 法律によるものであれ、習慣によるものであれ -
黒人は劣った種であるとでもいうように扱った、恐ろしい仕打ちの象徴になりました。

segregation [N]人種差別、人種隔離政策、黒人差別
come (to do) …するようになる // I came to like "natto." 納豆が好きになった
symbolize [V]…を象徴する
whether by A or by B AであれBであれ
as though ... とでも言うように…
inferior [A]劣っている
species [N]【生物】種


It was only in the 1950s that the laws began to be overturned by the Supreme Court.
The highest court in the United States said
that school segregation was against the Constitution.
1950年代にようやく、法律は最高裁判所によって覆され始めました。
アメリカで一番権力のある裁判所が、
学校の人種差別は憲法に背いていると表明したのです。

overturn ひっくり返す / (決定・決議を)覆す / 否決する
the Supreme Court [N]【法律】<<米>>(州/連邦の)最高裁判所
the Constitution [N]憲法


That's only 60 years ago!
The other laws were overturned in the 1960s.
Even so, many would say our country still hasn't resolved many of the issues
from the time of segregation.
たった60年前の事ですよ!
他の法律は1960年代に覆されました。
それでも、我々の国はまだ人種差別時代の問題の多くは
解決していないと言う人は大勢いるのです。

even so たとえそうだとしても
resolve [V]解決する
issue [V]問題(点)


* * * * * * * *

回り込み解除

※ 英語が分からない自分用の予習メモです。

※ 2014年8月 3週目は、2週目の再放送週です。



* * * * * * * *


>> August 23rd, 2014 (Sat.)

What are you drawing? You want me to guess?
Well, that looks like a city. And what's this around the city?
Water? So, it's a city on a island? And it's sinking?

Is it Venice? No, it's not Venice. Oh, I know, it's Atlantis.
So, did you learn about Atlantis at school today?
Yes, what did they tell you? Well, there's little more to it than that.

See, there was this ancient Greek philosopher called Plato.
And he created the story of Atlantis.
Why? I'll get to that.

The island was the land of Poseidon, got of the sea,
and its people were descended from him. The city had an amazing design.

A palace was at its center, ringed by a series of larger moats.
Along each moat ran a great wall made of red, white, and black rock,
and the city was spread across these rings of land.
A canal connected the city to the sea.

It was supposed to have been an incredibly advanced civilization,
but its inhabitants grew too proud, too greedy, and too wicked.
They started to attack their neighbors and take their land.

The gods decided they would punish them.
This was around twelve thousand years ago.
They had the sea swallow up the city.
Yes, they sent it to the bottom of the sea. Scary, isn't it?

Since then, people have been arguing about where this city is, if it existed at all.
I'm sorry, but most people think it wasn't real.
But even if it wasn't, it still makes for an exciting story.



* * * * * * * *


>> August 23rd, 2014 (Sat.)

What are you drawing? You want me to guess?
Well, that looks like a city. And what's this around the city?
Water? So, it's a city on a island? And it's sinking?
何を描いているの?当てて欲しいの?
そうねえ、街のように見えるわ。町のまわりは何?
水?と言うことは、これは島にある街?沈んでいるの?

Atlantis [N]アトランティス // 語源はAtlas<<天空を双肩に担ぐ大力無双の巨人>>
<<ジブラルタル海峡の西方にあったが、神罰によって沈没したといわれる楽土>>
sink [V]沈む / 沈没する


Is it Venice? No, it's not Venice. Oh, I know, it's Atlantis.
So, did you learn about Atlantis at school today?
Yes, what did they tell you? Well, there's little more to it than that.
ヴェニス?ヴェニスじゃないの。うーん、分かった。アトランティスね。
アトランティスについて今日、学校で習ったの?
そう、何て言っていたの?なるほど。もう少し話があるわ。

See, there was this ancient Greek philosopher called Plato.
And he created the story of Atlantis.
Why? I'll get to that.
いいかな。プラトンという古代ギリシャの哲学者がいたの。
彼はアトランティスの物語を作ったのよ。
何故?その話を始めるわね。

ancient [A]古代の <<西ローマ帝国の滅亡476年辺りまでを指すことが多い>>
[the ancient [N]ギリシャ、ローマ、ヘブライ、エジプトの古代文明人を指す]
philosopher [N]哲学者 // philo = …を愛する soph = 知 -er = …する人
[Sophia University = 上智大学 / 米大学2年生 sophomore = sopho 賢明な + more 愚かな]
Plato [N]プラトン <<427-347 B.C. ギリシャの哲学者>>
[Socratesソクラテス / Aristotleアリストテレス]


The island was the land of Poseidon, got of the sea,
and its people were descended from him. The city had an amazing design.
島はポセイドンの土地、ポセイドンは海の神よ。
その民は彼の子孫だったの。街は素晴らしい設計でね。

Poseidon [N]ポセイドン<<ギリシャ神話:海神/ローマ神話:Neptune>>
descended (from ...) [A](…の)子孫である


A palace was at its center, ringed by a series of larger moats.
Along each moat ran a great wall made of red, white, and black rock,
and the city was spread across these rings of land.
A canal connected the city to the sea.
宮殿は中央に位置し、ひと続きの巨大な堀に囲まれていたの。
それぞれの堀に沿い延びる大きな壁は、赤、白、黒の石で出来ていてね、
街は陸の輪の中に広がっていたのよ。
運河は街と海を繋いでいてね。

ring [V]輪のように取り囲む be ringed (by...)[受け身](…に)囲まれる
moat [N](都市・城壁の周囲に掘られた)堀


It was supposed to have been an incredibly advanced civilization,
but its inhabitants grew too proud, too greedy, and too wicked.
They started to attack their neighbors and take their land.
街は信じられないほど進んだ文明を持ち続けていると思われたけれど、
住民はとても傲慢で、強欲で、そして不道徳になってしまったの。
彼らは近隣を侵攻し始め、土地を奪ったの。

incredibly [ADV]信じられないほどに / <<口語>>非常に
advanced [A](文明・思想など)進歩した / 先進的な
□ civilization [N]文明
inhabitant [N]住民 // habitantも「住人」を表すが通常inhabitantを使う
<habitant = カナダ:ケベックやアメリカ:ルイジアナ州に初期に定住したフランス系移民を指すことも>
proud [A]誇らしげな / 高慢な ⇔ humble[A]控えめな / 卑しい
[proud/humble は良い意味でも悪い意味でも使われる // arrogant横柄な / 傲慢な]
greedy [A]貪欲な / 強欲な / 切望して
wicked [A]不道徳な / 邪悪な


The gods decided they would punish them.
This was around twelve thousand years ago.
They had the sea swallow up the city.
Yes, they sent it to the bottom of the sea. Scary, isn't it?
神々は彼らを罰することを決めたの。
約1万2千年前のことね。
神々のもつ海は街を飲み込んだの。
そう、アトランティスを海の底に送ったのよ。怖いわね。

swallow (up) [V](波・群衆などが)(…を)飲み込む / 見えなくする


Since then, people have been arguing about where this city is, if it existed at all.
I'm sorry, but most people think it wasn't real.
But even if it wasn't, it still makes for an exciting story.
それ以来、人々は街はどこにあるのか議論しているの。本当に存在していたらだけどね。
残念だけれど、ほとんどの人は現実の話ではないと思っているのよ。
存在しなくても、それはまだわくわくする話として役立っているけどね。

□ Since then それ以来
□ argue [V]論議する
□ at all 少しでも
□ make for 促進する / 役立つ


* * * * * * * *

回り込み解除

※ 英語が分からない自分用の予習メモです。


* * * * * * * *


>> August 9th, 2014 (Sat.)

We went to a beautiful exhibition today. All van Gogh.
They had some of his most famous paintings there:
Sunflowers, Starry Night, Irises, his portraits, and of course, his self portraits.
What amazes me every time I see his work is how modern it feels.
I can't believe they were painted in the second half of the 19th century!

In fact, as I learned today, much of his most famous work was painted
in the final years of his life before he shot himself. He was only 37.
I mean, you look at some of those self portraits and you see a man older than his years.

What was great about the exhibition was that it really immersed you in his life.
Everyone knows of van Gogh as the archetypical troubled artist -
the one who cut off his own ear. But it was fascinating - and saddening -
to see how he struggled with mental illness,
with depression and anxiety, throughout his life.
And, how this may have affected his work.
It was also fascinating to see how his style developed.

You could see the influence of the impressionists from the 1880s;
the way he began to use color in brighter,
more imaginative ways after he moved to the south of France;
the way he started applying thick layers of color to give his paintings
that hallucinogenic quality.

Also, that quality of getting beyond the surface of things to the psychology underneath,
say, a landscape or portrait.
It's amazing, isn't it, in hindsight, that he was appreciated by so few people during his life.


* * * * * * * *


>> August 9th, 2014 (Sat.)

We went to a beautiful exhibition today. All van Gogh.
They had some of his most famous paintings there:
Sunflowers, Starry Night, Irises, his portraits, and of course, his self portraits.
What amazes me every time I see his work is how modern it feels.
I can't believe they were painted in the second half of the 19th century!
今日、素晴らしい展覧会に行ってきました。ゴッホの個展です。
非常に有名な絵の数々が展覧会にはありました。
「ひまわり」「星月夜」「アイリス」、肖像画、それと勿論、彼の自画像。
何時見ても驚くのは、彼の作品は新しい感じがすることですね。
19世紀後半に描かれたとは信じられません!

Vincent van Gogh [N]フィンセント・ファン・ゴッホ<<1853-90 オランダの画家>>
exhibition [N]展覧会 / 博覧会
starry night [N]星月夜 / 星の多い夜
Iris [N]【植物】アヤメ / 【解剖】(眼球の)虹彩
portrait [N]肖像画 / 肖像写真 / 生き生きとした描写
self portrait [N]自画像 // 自撮りselfie
second half [N]後半 / 下半期


In fact, as I learned today, much of his most famous work was painted
in the final years of his life before he shot himself. He was only 37.
I mean, you look at some of those self portraits and you see a man older than his years.
実のところ、今日覚えたのですが、彼の非常に有名な作品の多くは
彼の晩年に、彼が自身を撃つ前に描かれたのです。彼はたった37歳でした。
つまり、見ている彼の自画像たちは、彼の年齢より老けて見えるということです。


What was great about the exhibition was that it really immersed you in his life.
Everyone knows of van Gogh as the archetypical troubled artist -
the one who cut off his own ear. But it was fascinating - and saddening -
to see how he struggled with mental illness,
with depression and anxiety, throughout his life.
And, how this may have affected his work.
It was also fascinating to see how his style developed.
展覧会の何が素晴らしかったかというと、本当にゴッホの一生にどっぷり浸かれることですね。
皆、ゴッホが問題の多い画家の典型だった事は知っています -
ゴッホは自分の耳を切り落としたり。しかし魅力的です。 - 悲しいですが。 -
彼が精神的な病気、鬱病や不安、に生涯苦しんでいたのを目にして。
それが彼の作品に影響を及ぼしたのかもしれません。
彼のスタイルがどう発達したのか見られたのも面白かったです。

immerse [V](どっぷりと)浸す / 没頭させる
□ dip [V](少しだけ)浸す □ dunk [V](パンなどを)[飲み物に]つける / 浸す
archetypical [A] = archetypal 典型的な / 原型的な
troubled [A]乱れている / 困っている / (婉曲表現で)精神を病んでいる troubled water=激流
fascinate [V](人を)魅惑する // fascinating[A]魅惑的な / 凄く面白い
sadden [V](人を)悲しませる // saddening[A](人を)悲しませる
struggle [V]もがく / 苦労する / 努力する / 戦う
depression [N]【医療】鬱病 / 意気消沈 / 憂鬱
anxiety [N]心配 / 不安 // anxiousの名詞形
throughout [ADV](時間を表して)その間ずっと / 終始
affect [V]影響を及ぼす / ※悪影響を及ぼす方向で用いられる


You could see the influence of the impressionists from the 1880s;
the way he began to use color in brighter,
more imaginative ways after he moved to the south of France;
the way he started applying thick layers of color to give his paintings
that hallucinogenic quality.
1880年代から印象派の影響が見られます。
フランス南部に移ってから、明るい色を使い始め、より想像力に富むのような、
絵具の厚い層を絵に塗り始め、絵は幻覚を引き起こすようなものになったようなね。

influence [V]影響を及ぼす // (人の行動を)左右する / 促して…させる
impressionists [N]印象派
the way <<口語>>いかに / のように
imaginative [A]想像力に富む / 想像的な
apply [V]塗る / つける / 適用する / 注ぐ
hallucinogenic [A]幻覚を起こさせる(ような)


Also, that quality of getting beyond the surface of things to the psychology underneath,
say, a landscape or portrait.
It's amazing, isn't it, in hindsight, that he was appreciated by so few people during his life.
それから、物の表面を超えて心の底に響くような出来ですね。
本当に。風景画にせよ、肖像画にせよ。
驚きますね。今から見れば、ゴッホが生きている内に少しの人にしか評価されなかったとは。

quality [N]資質 / 品質 // 人に対しても使用 have the qualities of a leader リーダーの資質
surface [N]表面
underneath [P]…の下に [ADV]下に [N]下部 / 隠れた / 根底の
□ say [賛意・感嘆などを表して]本当に / まったく [注意を引くために用いて]ねえ / もし / おい
landscape [N]風景画 / 風景
in hindsight [N]あとから振り返ってみれば / あと知恵 ⇔ foresight先見の明 / 見通し
appreciate [V]真価を認める / 評価する


* * * * * * * *

回り込み解除

※ 英語が分からない自分用の予習メモです。


* * * * * * * *


>> August 2nd, 2014 (Sat.)

What's uni? A sea urchin?
As in that black round thing with the spines that you find in the ocean?
No, I haven't eaten one before. I'm not sure that I want to.
Are you sure it's good? Is it cooked? It's just served raw? I don't know ...
No, I don't think the fact that sea otters and some kinds of eel like to eat them
will make me want to try it. Nice try, though.

So what part of the sea urchin would we eat? The roe?
Is this just a Japanese thing? No? Is that true?
Sea urchin is eaten around the Mediterranean? Also raw?
But often mixed into pasta sauces and used to flavor omelets and soups ...
I think you're pulling my leg. In Chile, too? Really?

And in the West Indies, they eat ... what did you call them? ... white sea urchins.
They have blunter spines than the black ones.
Are the spines poisonous?
Even if they aren't, it probably wouldn't be pleasant stepping on one.

So why is it called a sea urchin anyway?
Doesn't urchin mean a poor street kid? Urchin is an old word for what?
Little hedgehog? I guess that makes sense.
And so what do sea urchins eat? Algae and mussels and small fish.
Aren't they bad for the environment - the sea urchin, I mean?
I thought I read somewhere that they destroy coral reefs and the marine environment.

At least I got one thing right.
So you're saying that's all the more reason why I should try one?
Oh, go on then, I give up, let me have a taste.


* * * * * * * *


>> August 2nd, 2014 (Sat.)

What's uni? A sea urchin?
As in that black round thing with the spines that you find in the ocean?
No, I haven't eaten one before. I'm not sure that I want to.
Are you sure it's good? Is it cooked? It's just served raw? I don't know ...
No, I don't think the fact that sea otters and some kinds of eel like to eat them
will make me want to try it. Nice try, though.
「ウニ」って何?シー・アーチン?
それは棘があって黒くて丸い、海で見つかるもの?
いいえ、食べたことは無いわ。食べたい、とは言い切れないわね。
美味しいと断言できる?火は通してある?生で食べられるの?よく分からないわ…
いいえ、ラッコやある種のウナギが好んで食べていても、試したいとは思わないわ。良い試みだけれど。

sea urchin [N]ウニ // 海のハリネズミの意味 // アリストテレスの提灯 = 【YouTube】
□ as in [ADV]In the sense of …とは…
Bow as in weapon, not the front of a ship. (bowとは武器[弓]、船の前方[船首bow]ではない)
spine [N]棘 / 脊柱 = backbone
□ sure (that) 確信して
cooked [A]料理(加熱調理)された [V]cook 調理する
[加熱調理しないサンドウィッチなどの場合 make / prepare を使う]
be served [V][受け身](飲食物が)出される / 給仕される
raw [A]生の / 未加工の
sea otter [N]ラッコ
eel [N]ウナギ


So what part of the sea urchin would we eat? The roe?
Is this just a Japanese thing? No? Is that true?
Sea urchin is eaten around the Mediterranean? Also raw?
But often mixed into pasta sauces and used to flavor omelets and soups ...
I think you're pulling my leg. In Chile, too? Really?
それで、ウニのどの部分を食べるの?生殖巣?
日本だけのもの?違うの?本当に?
地中海沿岸周辺で食べられている?やっぱり生で?
でも、よくパスタソースに混ぜたり、オムレツやスープの風味付けに使われている…
からかっているのかと思うわ。チリでも?本当に?

roe [N]生殖巣 / (雌魚などの)卵 / (雄魚などの)魚精
□ The Mediterranean 地中海の / 地中海岸の
flavor [V]風味を添える / 味を付ける / 風趣を添える
pull one's leg (人を)からかう [直訳:足を引っ張る]
Chile [N]チリ<<南米南西部太平洋岸の共和国:首都Santiago>>


And in the West Indies, they eat ... what did you call them? ... white sea urchins.
They have blunter spines than the black ones.
Are the spines poisonous?
Even if they aren't, it probably wouldn't be pleasant stepping on one.
西インド諸島で、食べる…何と呼ばれてたっけ?…ホワイト・シー・アーチンね。
黒いウニより、尖っていない棘を持つのね。
棘には毒があるの?
無くても、おそらく踏んだら愉快ではないでしょうね。

white sea urchin 【ホワイト・シー・アーチン画像右下】
blunt [A](刃先など)鈍い / なまくらの / 無遠慮な / 無愛想な
[blunt ⇔ sharp // Can I be blunt with you? = バッサリ言っていい?]
poisonous [A]有毒な / 毒性のある
□ even if …だとしても
□ pleasant [A]楽しい / 愉快な / 心地よい


So why is it called a sea urchin anyway?
Doesn't urchin mean a poor street kid? Urchin is an old word for what?
Little hedgehog? I guess that makes sense.
And so what do sea urchins eat? Algae and mussels and small fish.
Aren't they bad for the environment - the sea urchin, I mean?
I thought I read somewhere that they destroy coral reefs and the marine environment.
それで、とにかくどうして sea urchin と呼ばれているの?
urchin は貧しいストレートキッズを指すのでは? urchin は何の古い言い方なの?
小さいハリネズミ?それは納得するわね。
それで、ウニは何を食べるの?海藻類や貝類、小魚。
どこかでウニはサンゴ礁や海の環境を破壊していると読んだと思う。

street kid [N] ホームレスの子供、特に見捨てられ孤児の子供
urchin [N]貧しくて、しばしば悪戯好きな、都市の子供 // 腕白小僧 / 悪戯っ子 / 浮浪児
hedgehog [N]ハリネズミ hedge生垣 / hog豚 // porcupineヤマアラシ
make sense 道理にかなう / 意味をなす / 腑に落ちる
algae [N]海藻類
mussel [N]ムラサキイガイ / 貝類
coral reef [N]サンゴ礁


At least I got one thing right.
So you're saying that's all the more reason why I should try one?
Oh, go on then, I give up, let me have a taste.
少なくとも1つ正しく知っていたわ。
尚更ウニに挑戦してみるべきだって?
ああもう、そう言うのなら、まいったわ。味わってみましょう。

all the more reason why... 一層 ~する理由になる all the more尚更
go on 続ける / 好きにする / 言葉に甘える


* * * * * * * *

回り込み解除

※ 英語が分からない自分用の予習メモです。


* * * * * * * *


>> July 26th, 2014 (Sat.)

Alright, I'll tell you a story, but you have to go to sleep after that. Ready?
This is a true story. It really happened. Back in 1922,
the British Egyptologist Howard Carter found the tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamen,
who ruled Egypt more than 3,000 years ago. This was an amazing discovery.
Most of tombs in Egypt had been broken into by robbers,
but most of the treasures were still in this one,
including an amazing golden death mask.

Everyone was extremely excited, but then mysterious things started to happen.
There were strange omens, and people began to die.
Lord Carnavon cut himself shaving where he'd been bitten by mosquito
and died of an infected wound.
Others who visited the tomb also began to drop off:
a few died of illness, another was shot by his wife,
another died from a botched operation, and still another committed suicide.

Carter died about fifteen years later,
and some say it was because the curse had finally gotten him.
Yes, the curse. On the walls of Tutankhamen's tomb was written:
"Death shall come on swift wings to he who disturbs the peace of the King."

Some people said the deaths were caused
by some poisonous fungus in the tomb - maybe as a trap. Of course,
the whole thing turned out to be complete baloney cooked up by the newspapers.
Most of the people involved in the expedition lived to a ripe old age
and there was no curse on the tomb's walls.
But still it's a good story, isn't it?


* * * * * * * *


>> July 26th, 2014 (Sat.)


Alright,
I'll tell you a story, but you have to go to sleep after that. Ready?
This is a true story. It really happened. Back in 1922,
the British Egyptologist Howard Carter found the tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamen,
who ruled Egypt more than 3,000 years ago. This was an amazing discovery.
Most of tombs in Egypt had been broken into by robbers,
but most of the treasures were still in this one,
including an amazing golden death mask.
よし、お話するよ。でも、話しが終わったら寝なくちゃいけないよ。いいかい?
これは本当のお話だ。本当に起こったんだよ。1922年に遡る。
イギリスのエジプト学者ハワード・カーターがツタンカーメン王の墓を見つけた。
三千年以上前のエジプトを治めた人物だよ。これは驚くべき発見だった。
ほとんどのエジプトの墓は泥棒に侵入されていた。
でも、大部分の宝物はまだ墓にあって、
素晴らしい金の仮面も含まれていた。

curse [N]呪い / 悪態 / 罵りの言葉 [V]呪う / 悪態を付く / 罵る
curse ⇔ blessing祝福 // put a curse on ... = …に呪いを掛ける
four-letter word卑猥語 // swear word罵り言葉
swear[V]罰当たりな事を言う <<みだりに神の名を呼んだり、口汚い言葉を用いる事>>

Tutankhamen [N]ツタンカーメン<<紀元前14世紀後半のエジプトの王>>
Egyptologist [N]エジプト学者
tomb [N]墓 // resting place = grave
□ loo [N]<<英国語>>お手洗い
Pharaoh [N]ファラオ<<古代エジプト王の称号>>
<<大文字と小文字で意味が別れる : pharaoh = 専制的な君主 / 暴君 tyrant>>
God = キリスト教の神 / 創造神 → god = キリスト以外の神や仏等
Book = 聖書 → book = 本

rule [V]統治する / 治める
break into ... 侵入する / 押し入る
robber [N]<通例暴力を用いての>泥棒 thief暴力に頼らずコッソリ行う泥棒
death mask [N]デスマスク = 死者の顏をかたどったもの



Everyone was extremely excited, but then mysterious things started to happen.
There were strange omens, and people began to die.
Lord Carnavon cut himself shaving where he'd been bitten by mosquito
and died of an infected wound.
Others who visited the tomb also began to drop off:
a few died of illness, another was shot by his wife,
another died from a botched operation, and still another committed suicide.
皆、物凄く大騒ぎしたけれど、不可思議な事が起こり始めた。
不吉な前兆があった。そして人が死に始めたんだ。
カーナヴォン卿は髭剃りで、蚊に刺されたところを切って
感染症で亡くなった。
墓を訪れた他の人もまた命を落とし始めた。
数人は病気で亡くなり、他には妻に打ち殺されたり、
手術が失敗して亡くなったり、さらに自殺したり。

extremely [ADV]極めて / 凄く
omen [N]前兆 / 兆し [V]…の前兆になる
□ shaving [N]髭剃り / 剃ること cut myself shaving 自分を髭剃りで切る
□ bite [V]噛み付く / (蚊・ノミが)刺す
infected wound 傷口に細菌が感染すること
infect[V]感染させる wound[N]傷
drop off 死ぬ <起きている状態から寝ている状態へと変化する>
botched operation 手術の失敗 / 作戦失敗
botched[A]下手な / 下手で損なわれる operation[N]手術 / 運動 / 作動
commit [V](罪・過失などを)犯す / ゆだねる / 引き渡す



Carter died about fifteen years later,
and some say it was because the curse had finally gotten him.
Yes, the curse. On the walls of Tutankhamen's tomb was written:
"Death shall come on swift wings to he who disturbs the peace of the King."
カーターは約15年後に亡くなった。
それは呪いがとうとう彼を捕えたせいだ、と言う人もいる。
そう、呪いだよ。ツタンカーメンの墓の壁には
「王の眠りを妨げし者に、素早き翼に乗りて死が訪れん」と書かれていた。

swift [A]速い / 迅速な
disturb [V]かき乱す / 妨害する
Don't disturb yourself. どうぞお構いなく // disturbing images (暴力シーン等を含む)心を乱す映像



Some people said the deaths were caused
by some poisonous fungus in the tomb - maybe as a trap. Of course,
the whole thing turned out to be complete baloney cooked up by the newspapers.
Most of the people involved in the expedition lived to a ripe old age
and there was no curse on the tomb's walls.
But still it's a good story, isn't it?
ある人は墓の毒性のある菌により死がもたらされたと言う。もしかしたら罠として。もちろん、
結局はすべて新聞によってでっち上げられた完璧なでたらめだと分かったのだけど。
調査隊に関わった多くの人は十分な年まで生きたし、
墓の壁に呪いは無かった。
しかし、それでも面白い話だね。じゃないかい?

poisonous [A]有毒な / 毒性の(ある)
fungus 真菌類 / 菌類 / キノコ →<<複数形>>fungi
turn out [+to be...]結局(…であることが)分かる
baloney [N]たわごと / 馬鹿げたこと
cook up (話などを)こしらえる / でっち上げる
(be) involved in ... …に関わる involve[V](…に)影響を及ぼす / 関わる / 伴う / 巻き込む
expedition [N]調査隊 / 探検隊 / (探検・学術研究など一定の目的を持つ)旅行
live to a ripe old age 十分に長生きする
[ripe old age = 高齢 = 年齢を重ねると共に、内面の成熟もあるような状態を指す]
ripe 十分に熟した / 成熟した



* * * * * * * *

回り込み解除

※ 英語が分からない自分用の予習メモです。


* * * * * * * *


>> July 19th, 2014 (Sat.)

We're starting on our road trip next week.
Yes, we're going to be driving along Route 66 -
I figure I have to do the "Mother Road" once in my life.

We're going to be driving from Chicago to Santa Monica,
all 3,940 kilometers of it, through Illinois, through -
let me see if I can remember - Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas,
New Mexico, Arizona, and California.

We can see the Grand Canyon along the way,
and get our fill of mid - twentieth century Americana - the American heartlands.

We've been reading up about Route 66 to prepare,
so we know the basic facts about it - such as it was started on November 11, 1926,
and was one of the first highways in the United States.

It was planned as a way of moving industry west across the country
and connecting small town America to the cities.

We know about the Dust Bowl,
when the dust storms forced many people
to move toward the coast in search of agricultural jobs.
We've even read steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, which deals with that.

Yes, of course we know it doesn't actually exist anymore.
It was replaced by the Interstate Highway System, wasn't it,
because it couldn't handle all the traffic and there were more direct routes.

We've planned the trip
so that we will be driving roughly along the route of the original highway.
We've calculated that it will take a bit over two weeks.
So, we're excited. We're been wanting to do this for ages.
As the Bobby Troup song goes, we're going to get our kicks on Route 66.



* * * * * * * *


>> July 19th, 2014 (Sat.)

We're starting on our road trip next week.
Yes, we're going to be driving along Route 66 -
I figure I have to do the "Mother Road" once in my life.
来週、車で旅に出るの。
そう、ルート66に沿って運転するのよ -
人生で一度は「マザー・ロード」を走るべきだと思って。

road trip [N]車で行く旅行
drive along ... …に沿って運転する
figure [V][+(that)](…だと)思う / 考える / 判断する That figures = 計算に合う / 納得がいく
[N]図 / 数字 ⇒ [V](図や数字、絵などで)書き表す / 計算する ⇒ 考える
the Mother Road [N]ルート66 の異称


We're going to be driving from Chicago to Santa Monica,
all 3,940 kilometers of it, through Illinois, through -
let me see if I can remember - Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas,
New Mexico, Arizona, and California.

シカゴからサンタモニカまで運転するの。
3,940 ㎞ 、イリノイを通って、それから -
ええと、思い出せるかしら - ミズーリ、カンザス、オクラホマ、テキサス、
ニューメキシコ、アリゾナ、そしてカルフォルニアね。

let me see <<口語>>[疑い/思案などを示して]はてな / ええと
[ええと/そうね<<何かを思い出そうとしたり、答えが出ない時に用いる>>]


We can see the Grand Canyon along the way,
and get our fill of mid - twentieth century Americana - the American heartlands.
途中でグランドキャニオンも見れるし、
20世紀のアメリカに風物を - これぞアメリカというものを堪能できる。

fill [V](容器・場所などを)一杯にする / 満たす
get one's fill [IDIOM]堪能する / 満たされる
[one's fill = 存分/十分な量 // 動詞+one's fill の形でよく使われる]
get one's fill = (何かを)たっぷり得る : eat/drink one's fill = たっぷり食べる :
talk one's fill = 思う存分話す : cry one's fill = 思い切り泣く // 色々応用できる!
mid [A]中央の / 中部の / 中間の
Americana [N]アメリカに関するもの / アメリカの風物
heartland [N]中核地域 / 心臓部


We've been reading up about Route 66 to prepare,
so we know the basic facts about it - such as it was started on November 11, 1926,
and was one of the first highways in the United States.
準備のためにルート66について読み調べていてね。
だから、ルート66の基本的な事は知っているの。1926年の11月11日にできたとか、
アメリカの最も初期の国道の一つであるとか。

read up (十分に)研究[勉強]する / 読んで調べる / 色々なものを読む
□ such as ... …など
highway [N]幹線道路 / 国道 / 本道 // high = ×高い ○公の


It was planned as a way of moving industry west across the country
and connecting small‐town America to the cities.
ルート66は、地域をまたがって産業を西に広げ、
田舎町を都市につなぐために計画されたのよ。

small-town [A]田舎町


We know about the Dust Bowl,
when the dust storms forced many people
to move toward the coast in search of agricultural jobs.
We've even read steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, which deals with that.
ダストボウルについても知っているわ。その時、砂塵によって
多くの人々が沿岸部へ農作業の仕事を求めて移動させられたの。
それを題材にしたスタインベックの『怒りの葡萄』まで読んだのよ。

the Dust Bowl [N]黄塵地帯<<砂塵嵐(dust storm)が吹きまくる地帯>> bowl = 盆地
/ <<1930年代に砂嵐が襲った>>アメリカ中南部:ロッキー山脈東麓の大草原地帯
dust storm [N]砂嵐
force [V]強引に押し進める
in search of …を探して / を求めて
agricultural [A]農業の
wrath [N]<<文語>>激怒 / 怒り
The Grapes of Wrath [N]『怒りの葡萄』筆者:John Steinbeck
<<大恐慌と砂嵐の影響で、故郷オクラホマを離れた人々の物語>>
deal with ... …を扱う


Yes, of course we know it doesn't actually exist anymore.
It was replaced by the Interstate Highway System, wasn't it,
because it couldn't handle all the traffic and there were more direct routes.
ええ、もちろん、今はもうルート66が廃線になったのは知っているわ。
ルート66は、州間高速道路システムに取って代わられた、そうよね、
交通量を捌き切れなくなくなったから、もっと直行するルートがあったから。

□ actually [ADV]現時点では
exist [V]存在する
replace [V][with / by][を / と]取り換える / 交換する
[受け身: It was replace by ... …に取って代わられた]
Interstate Highway System [N]州間高速道路システム
[ふたつ以上の州を結ぶ道路網のことを指す]
wasn't it 違う?


We've planned the trip
so that we will be driving roughly along the route of the original highway.
We've calculated that it will take a bit over two weeks.
So, we're excited. We've been wanting to do this for ages.
As the Bobby Troup song goes, we're going to get our kicks on Route 66.
大雑把にルート66に沿って運転できるように旅行の計画をしてあるの。
計画は2週間ちょっとかかる計算ね。
そんなわけで、ワクワクしているのよ。長い間ずっとやりたかったの。
ボビー・トラップの歌のように、ルート66を大いに楽しむわ。

so that ... …となるように / …するために
roughly [ADV]大雑把に / おおよそ / 概略で
□ original highway 初期の幹線道路 = ルート66
calculate [V]計画して準備する
for ages 長い間 / 久しく
get one's kicks 大いに楽しむ / 堪能する
kick [N]<<口語>>刺激 / 興奮 / スリル


* * * * * * * *

回り込み解除

※ 英語が分からない自分用の予習メモです。


* * * * * * * *


>> July 12th, 2014 (Sat.)

You know how every now and again
you come across something that you've heard about at of your life -
that everyone's heard about -
so you think you know all about it,
but you actually don't know anything about it?
I had that with the Panama Canal recently.

I mean, I knew that it was an artificial waterway in Central America,
connecting the Atlantic and the Caribbean to the Pacific.
But I didn't know that the land there was so mountainous.

There are locks along its almost 80-kilometer length
to lift the ships up to two lakes and through the mountains.
On the Caribbean side, the locks raise ships 26 meters - and without using pumps!

The history is interesting, too.
France began the project back in 1881 under the leadership of Ferdinand de Lesseps,
who designed the Suez Canal.

It was so difficult and costly that they had to give up,
but not before the project had gone bankrupt
and 22,000 people had died from accidents and disease.

The United States picked up where the French left off,
and completed the canal in 1914.
This meant that ships no longer had to travel
around the southern tip of South America to get to the Pacific.

Because the U.S. constructed the Canal,
it was the sole owner until the late 1970s, when it started sharing with Panama.
It was only in 1999 that the canal was handed over to Panama.

Initially, only about a thousand ships went through the canal.
Now it's more than 14.000 ships in a year.
Little wonder it's called one of the seven wonders of the modern world.



* * * * * * * *


>> July 12th, 2014 (Sat.)

You know how every now and again
you come across something that you've heard about at of your life -
that
everyone's heard about -
so you think you know all about it,
but you actually don't know anything about it?
I had that with the Panama Canal recently.
ねえ、時々、
日頃聞いていることで -
誰でも聞くことで、
すべて知っていると思っているけど、
実は何も知らないというもの、ふと思い浮かばない?
私はパナマ運河に最近そういうことがあったの。

you know [間を持たせるために用いて](…)ね / あのね
every now and again 時々 言い換え : occasionally [ADV]時々
come across (考えなどが)(頭)に浮かぶ / ふと思い浮かべる
canal [N]運河 / 人口水路


I mean, I knew that it was an artificial waterway in Central America,
connecting the Atlantic and the Caribbean to the Pacific.
But I didn't know that the land there was so mountainous.

つまり、パナマ運河が中央アメリカにある人造の水路で、
大西洋とカリブ海を太平洋につないでいるというのは知っていたのだけど。
そこの土地がとても山の多いところだと知らなかったの。

I mean つまり
artificial [A]人工的な / 人造の ⇒ man made [artificialより柔らかい言い方]
[artificial leg = 義足 artificial intelligence = 人工知能] ⇔natural
the Caribbean [N]カリブ海
[River ○○ / ○○ River と表記されることが多いが、川/海の名前にも the が付く
: The Tone runs through the Kanto Plain.[= 関東平野を走り抜ける利根川]
[River Avon = エイヴォン川 = Avon はケルト語で川 / 面白い地名の話]
mountainous [A]山の多い / 山地の


There are locks along its almost 80-kilometer length
to lift the ships up to two lakes and through the mountains.
On the Caribbean side, the locks raise ships 26 meters - and without using pumps!
長さ 約80 ㎞のパナマ運河に沿って
船を持ち上げて2つの湖と山々を越えさせる水門があるの。
カリブ海側にある水門は船を26 m上げるのよ。ポンプを使わずにね。

lock [N](運河の)閘門(こうもん) / 水門
<<高低差の大きい運河などで船舶を昇降させるための装置>>
□ along 沿う
lift [V]持ち上げる
□ up to している


The history is interesting, too.
France began the project back in 1881 under the leadership of Ferdinand de Lesseps,
who designed the Suez Canal.
歴史も面白いのよ。
フランスが1881年にフェルディナン・ド・レセップスの指揮の下で計画を開始したの。
彼はスエズ運河を設計した人よ。

back in ... 遡って…の時に
under the leadership of ... …の指揮のもと


It was so difficult and costly that they had to give up,
but not before the project had gone bankrupt
and 22,000 people had died from accidents and disease.

計画は難しく、損害が大きくて中止されたけど、
中止された時には既に計画は破産していて、
2万2千人の人が事故や病気で亡くなっていたの。

costly [A]多額の費用を要する / 犠牲(損害)の多い
[expensive = 買手の資産に比べて高い / costly = 品質が高い・貴重なために高い]
no before ... …より前ではない [既に…が起きているのニュアンス]
go bankrupt 破産する / 倒産する // go bad腐る
□ disease 病気


The United States picked up where the French left off,
and completed the canal in 1914.
This meant that ships no longer had to travel
around the southern tip of South America to get to the Pacific.

合衆国がフランスが中止したところを引き継いで進めて、
1914年に運河は完成したわ。
これは、船が太平洋に向かうのに、
もう南アメリカ大陸の南端を回る旅をしなくてよくなったということなの。

pick up (話・活動などを)(中断後)また始める
leave off 中止する / やめる
no longer [ADV]もはや…しない / 現在は…ない
tip [N]先端
□ get to …に達する


Because the U.S. constructed the Canal,
it was the sole owner until the late 1970s, when it started sharing with Panama.
It was only in 1999 that the canal was handed over to Panama.

アメリカが運河を建設したから、
アメリカが1970年代の終わりまで単独の所有者だったのだけど、
1970年にパナマと共同で管理し始めたの。
最近、1999年になって運河はパナマに引き渡されたわ。

construct [V]建設する / 組み立てる
solo [A]単独の / 独占的な ⇒ 類 : only / single
hand over (to ...) (…に)引き渡す [handover[N]譲渡]


Initially, only about a thousand ships went through the canal.
Now it's more than 14.000 ships in a year.
Little wonder it's called one of the seven wonders of the modern world.
当初はたった1千隻ほどの船しか運河を通らなかったの。
今では、年間1万4千隻以上よ。
現代の世界七不思議のひとつと呼ばれていても不思議はないわよね。

initially [ADV]当初は / 初めは [initial = 語頭に来る文字]
little wonder ... …には殆ど不思議はない / …は当然だ no wonder に近い
the seven wonders of the modern world 現在の世界七不思議
[世界七不思議ではない新しい物事が中心の七不思議を指す]
※アメリカ土木技術者学会より : 記事 
現代の世界七不思議:
①Channel Tunnel / 英仏海峡トンネル
②CN Tower / CNタワー
③Empire State Building / エンパイア・ステート・ビル
④Golden Gate Bridge / ゴールデンゲートブリッジ
⑤Itaipu Dam / イタイプダム
⑥Netherlands North Sea Protection Works / オランダ北海の保護ワークス
⑦Panama Canal / パナマ運河


* * * * * * * *

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Author:SOPHIE
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FFXIV NAME:Sophie Sapphire World:Chocobo/Masamune

❤=GAME/DRAWING

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